Monday, July 14, 2014

Move along, please. No vampires here.

I hope "The Strain" is a massive failure, no matter how well done it is. I have no animus towards anyone involved, but I'd like to see the whole vampiric enterprise die for at least a generation. Obviously it plucks some sympathetic chord and endlessly fascinates millions; but between the Twilight utes and those walking dead chaps, I'm quite drained. Why are vampires so popular? Why now? It can't all be a metaphor for hedge fund managers.

5 comments:

Nev said...

Mystifying, and utterly unappealing to me. I apply my one theory to everything, and it is something like this: that in America, life goes too smilingly, and so people are forced to create horrors that, for the most part, don't exist in real life. I think if death were raining down from the skies on me as I drive out to Mill Valley, I might take a different view of everything. Or on my kid when she goes to the beach at Amagansett. If people died at home. If lots of bad things happened, as they do elsewhere. We have abolished bad things here, so we are forced to create fake ones. That's how I feel about roller-coasters, too. Safety begets a need for danger. The irony is that the danger is utterly safe. This does have something to do with vampires, I promise.

Richard Epstein said...

Still, the prevalence, and box-office mega-success, of superheroes suggest that people feel that they do not control their lives and wish for external, benevolent power to intervene on their behalves. I can't quite fit vampires into this model.

Nev said...

I can't fit myself into the popular culture in lots of ways. I think getting old means you become a person who just DOES NOT UNDERSTAND THINGS. That's me, anyway.

Richard Epstein said...

Of course maybe they're all zombies, not vampires at all. That wouldn't change things.

Nev said...

The zombie-vampire is the endless childhood American parents have given their children, that just won't die.